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I came to the Trail area in 1975, via Vancouver from Montreal, to earn my “fortune”. I have been “fortunate” having now spent my lifetime contributing to this community. I began working as a Community Nurse for Home Care in its 2nd year of inception in Greater Trail, holding a number of positions until retiring in 2010. At present, I do some contract teaching on Navigation, both for Nav- Care, a UBC research project and locally for the Poverty Reduction project. Like many people, I have drawn on personal experience to inspire me in my work with Hospice. I like to say that my father was able to die at home because he grew his own Homecare Nurse and caring for my mother taught me a great deal about Navigation through life limiting illness. I began my Hospice work as its’ first Coordinator in 1987, helping develop the program in this community. It is a privilege to now serve as a volunteer, currently the Board Chair. I see Hospice as one way that we support each other, bringing a bit of structure and accountability to caring and compassion. I feel that this is increasingly important and am excited to be part of guiding our Society.

Meet Our Board Members

I moved to Trail from Lynden, Washington in 2016. Before the big transition (getting married and moving across the border) I completed my Masters in Counseling Psychology, had a private counseling practice, was an Executive Director for a small non-profit helping those in need find the necessary resources for living, raised six wonderful kids into adults who are now very good friends, and volunteered with several community groups over the years. In the midst of all that living, I also acted as a medical advocate with several good friends who walked through the journey of advancing life-limiting illnesses, death, and on-going grief support with family members. I had the privilege of being with my father during his last days. In each of these times Hospice was an important part of our journeys together. I am pleased to now be a volunteer for and a member of the Greater Trail Hospice Society and share my life experiences helping others navigate well in what is often uncharted waters for many.

Chair Person: Brenda Hooper

Vice Chair: Lauree Morris

I moved to Trail in 1990 after working at a variety of accounting jobs. I began working for the City of Trail that same year as an accounting clerk with a major emphasis on payroll. I retired in 2017. I became a member of the Hospice Committee in the mid 90’s and served as Treasurer for 8 years before resigning. When the Greater Trail Hospice Society was formed in December 2010, I joined the Board and have served as Treasurer since then. I was drawn to Hospice as a result of a personal loss. My brother was a recipient of Hospice care in Edmonton. I was pleased that he received a high level of compassionate care from dedicated nurses and doctors. That compassionate care also extended to his family, explaining symptoms, what to expect and answering any questions we may have had. My brother had a peaceful two weeks in Hospice before he passed and the family had peace in knowing that he was receiving the best possible care.

Treasurer: Barbara Gibson

Life has provided me with many wonderful and eclectic experiences. I have worked in nursing in the North with Inuit and Dene, in several nursing homes (public and private), in community, and in nursing education. As a Pastor I have ministered in several different denominational communities. As a daughter, I was able to support both of my parents to achieve their personal goals of palliating and dying at home. Since moving to the Kootenays in 1992 I have also participated in many different roles with the Trail Hospice Society. In every setting and opportunity I have learned from people whose life is coming to a close that life is to be lived as fully as possible. Days and moments matter. Excellence in palliative care is about person-centered care and that is what I believe Hospice does best. As a Board member I look forward to helping Trail Hospice build capacity as we expand our programs and help our community understand that we are here to journey with each person through life-limiting illness and grief.

Secretary: Gail Potter

Member at Large: Marjorie Jack

My name is Marjorie Jack. I moved to Rossland in November, 2017, after 'retiring' from my work in Montreal as a nurse clinician for the Inuit population from northern Quebec. As part of a team, I worked in case management to help patients and their families, coming from Nunavik, navigate the tertiary and specialized health and social services within the McGill University Health Center (MUHC). This included coordinating palliative care services in collaboration with MUHC specialists and primary health care workers in the north, to provide patients, and their families, with life limiting illnesses, the opportunity to return home to their communities with the best possible hospice and palliative care. Part of this support included counselling patients and their families experiencing loss and grief, while in Montreal and ensuring continuity of this care upon their return north. Shortly after moving to Rossland, I joined the Greater Trail Hospice Society (GTHS) as a volunteer, then joined the Board. Volunteering with the GTHS has helped me gain insight into the B.C. health care system and the hospice and palliative care needs of the communities served by the GTHS. I look forward to helping the GTHS meet these needs effectively and compassionately.

Member at Large: Margaret MacDiarmid

My first exposure to palliative care was as an intern in Winnipeg where I learned a great deal from care providers, volunteers, family members and patients. I moved to Rossland in 1989 and worked in Trail as a family doctor for the next 18 years. My practice included palliative care and this was a truly meaningful and rewarding part of my work. My personal experiences with end of life of family members and close friends have been both good and bad. Sadly there is sometimes needless suffering for patients and for their families and I have experienced that myself. It is a strong motivator and I am delighted to have joined the hospice board and work to build on the existing strength of hospice in Trail. I lived in Vancouver from 2007 to 2018 and worked briefly as a family doctor there, took a year off for breast cancer treatment and recovery, and then became the MLA for Vancouver Fairview. I have an unusual background of having been a doctor, a patient, a politician, and probably most importantly a daughter wishing for better end of life care for my Dad. I hope to draw on all those experiences constructively as a member of the Greater Trail Hospice Society Board.

Member at Large: Anne Symington

It has been a rich and rewarding experience being a Hospice Volunteer for the last nine years and a trained Navigator for the last three years. I have appreciated the vision of the Board with its emphasis on education and inclusion. As a new Board member I look forward to supporting and expanding these values. I am a retired physiotherapist in love with the wonderful lifestyle found in the West Kootenay heartland.
The Greater Trail Hospice Society
Kootenay Internet Solutions
The Greater Trail Hospice Society
I came to the Trail area in 1975, via Vancouver from Montreal, to earn my “fortune”. I have been “fortunate” having now spent my lifetime contributing to this community. I began working as a Community Nurse for Home Care in its 2nd year of inception in Greater Trail, holding a number of positions until retiring in 2010. At present, I do some contract teaching on Navigation, both for Nav-Care, a UBC research project and locally for the Poverty Reduction project. Like many people, I have drawn on personal experience to inspire me in my work with Hospice. I like to say that my father was able to die at home because he grew his own Homecare Nurse and caring for my mother taught me a great deal about Navigation through life limiting illness. I began my Hospice work as its’ first Coordinator in 1987, helping develop the program in this community. It is a privilege to now serve as a volunteer, currently the Board Chair. I see Hospice as one way that we support each other, bringing a bit of structure and accountability to caring and compassion. I feel that this is increasingly important and am excited to be part of guiding our Society.

Meet Our Board

Members

Chair Person: Brenda Hooper

I moved to Trail from Lynden, Washington in 2016. Before the big transition (getting married and moving across the border) I completed my Masters in Counseling Psychology, had a private counseling practice, was an Executive Director for a small non- profit helping those in need find the necessary resources for living, raised six wonderful kids into adults who are now very good friends, and volunteered with several community groups over the years. In the midst of all that living, I also acted as a medical advocate with several good friends who walked through the journey of advancing life-limiting illnesses, death, and on-going grief support with family members. I had the privilege of being with my father during his last days. In each of these times Hospice was an important part of our journeys together. I am pleased to now be a volunteer for and a member of the Greater Trail Hospice Society and share my life experiences helping others navigate well in what is often uncharted waters for many.

Vice Chair: Lauree Morris

I moved to Trail in 1990 after working at a variety of accounting jobs. I began working for the City of Trail that same year as an accounting clerk with a major emphasis on payroll. I retired in 2017. I became a member of the Hospice Committee in the mid 90’s and served as Treasurer for 8 years before resigning. When the Greater Trail Hospice Society was formed in December 2010, I joined the Board and have served as Treasurer since then. I was drawn to Hospice as a result of a personal loss. My brother was a recipient of Hospice care in Edmonton. I was pleased that he received a high level of compassionate care from dedicated nurses and doctors. That compassionate care also extended to his family, explaining symptoms, what to expect and answering any questions we may have had. My brother had a peaceful two weeks in Hospice before he passed and the family had peace in knowing that he was receiving the best possible care.

Treasurer: Barbara Gibson

Life has provided me with many wonderful and eclectic experiences. I have worked in nursing in the North with Inuit and Dene, in several nursing homes (public and private), in community, and in nursing education. As a Pastor I have ministered in several different denominational communities. As a daughter, I was able to support both of my parents to achieve their personal goals of palliating and dying at home. Since moving to the Kootenays in 1992 I have also participated in many different roles with the Trail Hospice Society. In every setting and opportunity I have learned from people whose life is coming to a close that life is to be lived as fully as possible. Days and moments matter. Excellence in palliative care is about person-centered care and that is what I believe Hospice does best. As a Board member I look forward to helping Trail Hospice build capacity as we expand our programs and help our community understand that we are here to journey with each person through life-limiting illness and grief.

Secretary: Gail Potter

Member at Large: Marjorie Jack

My name is Marjorie Jack. I moved to Rossland in November, 2017, after 'retiring' from my work in Montreal as a nurse clinician for the Inuit population from northern Quebec. As part of a team, I worked in case management to help patients and their families, coming from Nunavik, navigate the tertiary and specialized health and social services within the McGill University Health Center (MUHC). This included coordinating palliative care services in collaboration with MUHC specialists and primary health care workers in the north, to provide patients, and their families, with life limiting illnesses, the opportunity to return home to their communities with the best possible hospice and palliative care. Part of this support included counselling patients and their families experiencing loss and grief, while in Montreal and ensuring continuity of this care upon their return north. Shortly after moving to Rossland, I joined the Greater Trail Hospice Society (GTHS) as a volunteer, then joined the Board. Volunteering with the GTHS has helped me gain insight into the B.C. health care system and the hospice and palliative care needs of the communities served by the GTHS. I look forward to helping the GTHS meet these needs effectively and compassionately.

Member at Large: Margaret MacDiarmid

My first exposure to palliative care was as an intern in Winnipeg where I learned a great deal from care providers, volunteers, family members and patients. I moved to Rossland in 1989 and worked in Trail as a family doctor for the next 18 years. My practice included palliative care and this was a truly meaningful and rewarding part of my work. My personal experiences with end of life of family members and close friends have been both good and bad. Sadly there is sometimes needless suffering for patients and for their families and I have experienced that myself. It is a strong motivator and I am delighted to have joined the hospice board and work to build on the existing strength of hospice in Trail. I lived in Vancouver from 2007 to 2018 and worked briefly as a family doctor there, took a year off for breast cancer treatment and recovery, and then became the MLA for Vancouver Fairview. I have an unusual background of having been a doctor, a patient, a politician, and probably most importantly a daughter wishing for better end of life care for my Dad. I hope to draw on all those experiences constructively as a member of the Greater Trail Hospice Society Board.

Member at Large: Anne Symington

It has been a rich and rewarding experience being a Hospice Volunteer for the last nine years and a trained Navigator for the last three years. I have appreciated the vision of the Board with its emphasis on education and inclusion. As a new Board member I look forward to supporting and expanding these values. I am a retired physiotherapist in love with the wonderful lifestyle found in the West Kootenay heartland.