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Types/Roles of Volunteers

What is a Hospice Volunteer?

“Hospice care allows people to live until they die, their families to live with them as they are dying and go on living afterwards...” — Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

What is Hospice?

A community-based program dedicated to providing support and compassionate care: For person’s with life-limiting illness Their family and friends Recently bereaved persons

We Believe

Hospice exists to affirm life by providing support to those in the last phase of life so that they can live as fully and comfortably as possible even while in the process of dying. “I chose to be a hospice volunteer because I believe that all people should have caring touch to the very end of their lives. I admire hospice volunteers because they are giving back, not taking and are willing and able to be with patients and families at this challenging time in life’s journey. — Peter Frothingham - Heart of Hospice, Heart-to-Heart Volunteer

What do Hospice volunteers do?

Provide visitation in homes, hospital or residential care facilities (all services are free). Offer friendship and support on an ongoing basis. Provide respite time for caregivers so they can rest or attend to daily tasks. Support enjoyable activities like playing cards, reading, writing letters, etc. Tell others about the work of Hospice and promote Hospice activities. Help with office work, fundraising, pamphlet distribution, or other tasks if necessary. Become Hospice Board Members if interested.

Types of Volunteers

Navigators – these experienced volunteers journey with those who have life-limiting chronic illness helping the person and their family navigate through change and challenges, connect with resources, learn about their conditions, and anticipate future needs. Bedside Volunteers – these volunteers are available to sit with people as they near the end of their life, and also provide respite time for caregivers. Friendly Visitors – these volunteers develop supportive relationships with residents who are in care facilities who may have few friends or family.

How to become a volunteer

Must be willing to complete a 20-hour volunteer training program which includes: Understanding the dying and grieving process Communication and listening skills Self awareness Knowledge of community resources and more… A person must complete a written application, criminal record check, and personal interview with the Program Coordinator.

To Contact:

Greater Trail Hospice Society Suite #7 1500 Columbia Avenue Trail, BC V1R 1J9 (250) 364-6204 Email: info@trailhospice.org “Caring” Caring is loving, motionles An interval of more or less Between stress and destress. After the present falls the past, After the festival, the fast. Always the deepest is last. This is the circle we must trace, Not spiralled outward, but a space Returning to its starting place. Center of all we mourn and bless, Center of all calm beyond excess, Who cares for caring, has caress. — F.R.Scott
The Greater Trail Hospice Society
Bcome a Volunteer Bcome a Volunteer Become a Board Member Become a Board Member
Kootenay Internet Solutions

Types/Roles of

Volunteers

What is a Hospice Volunteer?

“Hospice care allows people to live until they die, their families to live with them as they are dying and go on living afterwards...” — Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

What is Hospice?

A community-based program dedicated to providing support and compassionate care: For person’s with life-limiting illness Their family and friends Recently bereaved persons

We Believe

Hospice exists to affirm life by providing support to those in the last phase of life so that they can live as fully and comfortably as possible even while in the process of dying. “I chose to be a hospice volunteer because I believe that all people should have caring touch to the very end of their lives. I admire hospice volunteers because they are giving back, not taking and are willing and able to be with patients and families at this challenging time in life’s journey. — Peter Frothingham - Heart of Hospice, Heart-to-Heart Volunteer

What do Hospice volunteers do?

Provide visitation in homes, hospital or residential care facilities (all services are free). Offer friendship and support on an ongoing basis. Provide respite time for caregivers so they can rest or attend to daily tasks. Support enjoyable activities like playing cards, reading, writing letters, etc. Tell others about the work of Hospice and promote Hospice activities. Help with office work, fundraising, pamphlet distribution, or other tasks if necessary. Become Hospice Board Members if interested.

Types of Volunteers

Navigators – these experienced volunteers journey with those who have life-limiting chronic illness helping the person and their family navigate through change and challenges, connect with resources, learn about their conditions, and anticipate future needs. Bedside Volunteers – these volunteers are available to sit with people as they near the end of their life, and also provide respite time for caregivers. Friendly Visitors – these volunteers develop supportive relationships with residents who are in care facilities who may have few friends or family.

How to become a volunteer

Must be willing to complete a 20-hour volunteer training program which includes: Understanding the dying and grieving process Communication and listening skills Self awareness Knowledge of community resources and more… A person must complete a written application, criminal record check, and personal interview with the Program Coordinator.

To Contact:

Greater Trail Hospice Society Suite #7 1500 Columbia Avenue Trail, BC V1R 1J9 (250) 364-6204 Email: info@trailhospice.org “Caring” Caring is loving, motionles An interval of more or less Between stress and destress. After the present falls the past, After the festival, the fast. Always the deepest is last. This is the circle we must trace, Not spiralled outward, but a space Returning to its starting place. Center of all we mourn and bless, Center of all calm beyond excess, Who cares for caring, has caress. — F.R.Scott
The Greater Trail Hospice Society